Rabbi Yehuda Zev Segal - Art

During World War II, England, like all other countries in the free world, refused to accept refugees who might become dependent on the state. Thus, any refugee who applied for admission to the country had to present a statement signed by a British citizen who promised to assume responsibility for the refugee's material needs. In order to rescue as many refugees as possible, Rav Solomon Schoenfeld of London launched a project to secure affidavits from British Jews. RabbiYehuda Zev greatly assisted him in these efforts, working primarily among Gateshead's Jews. In 1940, German bombers attacked Gateshead, and many people left the city for safer areas. Rabbi Yehuda Zev and his family moved to Manchester, where he remained for the rest of his life. In Manchester he assumed the position of giving lectures in the Manchester Yeshiva, where his father served as Head of the yeshiva. From there, he continued to secure visas for war refugees. During the war, the Manchester Yeshiva opened its doors to young refugees fleeing the Nazi inferno. As the war intensified, the yeshiva expanded its rescue and relief efforts, organizing daily shiurim for young men who due to the war were unable to attend yeshiva full time. Rav Yehuda Zev opened his own home to many of the young refugees.

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